Genome Maintenance and Cancer Seminar Series

offered this fall and spring semester

This seminar series explores current topics ranging from the basic biology of DNA replication and repair to our current understanding of how defects in these pathways drive cancer initiation, progression and response to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. The GMaC Seminar Series builds upon the pressing need to bring together clinicians and basic scientists working at the interface between DNA replication and repair to achieve a greater understanding of how these mechanisms impact cancer initiation and anti-tumor therapy.

When: Select Friday’s at 11:00 AM

Where: Zoom Webinar. You will receive an email five days before each seminar, asking you to register. After registering, you will receive an email with the Webinar details and log on information.

Who can attend: This lecture series is designed for clinicians, basic science researchers, students, residents, fellows, post-doctoral scholars, and anyone else who wishes to learn more about these topics from experts in the DNA repair, replication, and cancer fields.

Contact brittniblack@wustl.edu to learn more and view a list with upcoming dates and speakers.

Past Speakers

February 12, 2021
Philippe Pasero, PhD,
Institut de Génétique Humaine (IGH), France
Title: “Causes and consequences of endogenous replication stress”

January 15, 2021
Shan Zha, MD, PhD,
Columbia University
Title: “Inhibition ≠ deletion, from ATM to PARP”

December 18, 2020
Lee Zou, PhD,
Harvard Medical School
Title: “The ATR signaling pathway: from basic research to targeted cancer therapy”

December 4, 2020
Hyungjin Kim, PhD,
Stony Brook University
Title: “Control of genome integrity at DNA replication forks”

November 20, 2020
Sharon Cantor, PhD,
UMASS Medical School
Title: “Focusing on the Gap in Chemotherapy Response”

November 6, 2020
Susan Rosenberg, PhD,
Baylor College of Medicine
Title: “The DNA Damageome and Cancer”

October 9, 2020
Eric Kool, PhD, Standford University
“Molecular Probes of DNA Repair: Uncovering Connections to Cancer and Inflammation”

September 18, 2020
Susan Wallace, PhD, University of Vermont
“The DNA Glycosylases that recognize oxidized DNA bases: Who are they and what have they got to do with cancer?”